Resources for the Intentional Parent

Momma Commotion

When life as a mom calls for technology...with a side of mommy guilt

Sometimes screen time is a lifesaver—but all too often, it comes with a load of mommy guilt attached.

It was one of those days. My three-year-old sat at the kitchen counter eating her lunch out of glass bowl. No sooner had I gone into the bathroom and shut the door than CRASH! … I raced back toward the noise. There were shards of glass and chunks of clam chowder everywhere. My eleven-month-old waddled toward the commotion as my overprotective five-year-old shrieked, “You’re gonna cut your feet! You’re gonna cut your feet!” I scooped up the waddler and my three-year-old all while calming five-year-old. This day needed a do-over, so I reached for my fail-safe, do-it-when-you-need-five-minutes-of-alone-time method so I could clean up the mess: the TV. Thank goodness for Mike the Knight on Nick Jr. His bubbly, cartoony body, fun voice, and supporting characters kept all of my kids’ eyes glued on his story for at least that five minutes.

For most moms, the decision to place three young kids in front of the television isn’t really a tough one. We do it every day … sometimes for hours a day … Just because we need to breathe, rest, or unfrazzle the craziness that is our day-to-day life as a mom. But that choice causes most of us some kind of mommy guilt.

The mommy guilt flood gates opened wide. Whether it was five minutes or hours a day…it was there. Was I a bad mom? Was I ruining my kids? There had to be at least one sound pediatrician out there that would agree that my sanity was well worth the damage I was causing to my kids’ little, developing brains, right? Well, there just had to be that one person who could understand. I reran the unrealistic expectations back through my head: “No television until 2 years of age…none whatsoever,” “Think of alternatives to technology, like crafts or even puzzles or workbooks,” “Even educational technology is still technology.” Wow, these professionals don’t allow any wiggle room for mommy sanity…none! Do they not have kids? Have they never needed five minutes to clean up clam chowder and glass? I am a bad mom, ugh.

It was after that “clam chowder incident” that I ran into a contact I had years before. We got to chatting about the world of technology and kids, and I thought of that choice, that moment, when I chose to turn their brains to applesauce so I could get something done. It felt like a confessional, “Forgive me, for I have sinned. I put my eleven-month-old in a high chair in front of Mike the Knight (gasp).”

Then he started to talk about his BIG idea to revolutionize the way families approach technology, to turn technology into a positive instead of a negative, and to wipe away all that parenting guilt by giving parents confidence and boundaries surrounding their screen time.

In that moment, I got it. He was a dad too. Not just an entrepreneur with an idea, but he really got it. Kids are surrounded by technology in today’s world. That’s just reality. Instead of judgment and guilt, parents need acceptance and empowerment to control technology in a positive way.

This guy was preaching to the choir! I want a better life for my kids, but I also don’t want my kids to be the only ones who show up to school and don’t know how to use an iPad. That balance is key—and tough, to be completely honest. There is a lot of gray area between “damage” and “skill-building through technology.” The more he told me about his new product, the more I knew it was just what our family needed … what every family needed.

I was so entranced with Kudoso, I decided to join the team. Kudoso is going to change the way that we as moms view technology, how we work with our kids—not against them—to ensure they are developing, growing, and safe. Kudoso helps moms (like me) keep tech in check.

This new, game-changing product is launching soon.
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